Mandatory Victim Surcharge

The Federal Government has a new policy that if a person is charged with a criminal offense and found guilty, they pay surcharge fees. To me this matter is appalling. It is a proven fact that people are committing crimes because they have mental health issues and or they are in state of poverty. The victim surcharge does not help anyone.

Last, this new policy has hallmark of pyrrhic defeat theory. It is a policy that poor people will come in contact with police and white collar crimes are hidden underneath of a rug. The policy will only marginalize people further and causes more harm to people. It may encourage police officers to lay criminal charges against people to meet certain economic demands, and people would not trust police. Once again politicians are responsible for injustice in our society.

https://www.canada.ca/en/department-justice/news/2016/10/federal-victim-surcharge.html

Advertisements

Raising the Minimum Wage to $15 as If We are Raising Roof on People’s Head

Raising the minimum wage to $15 as if we are raising the roof on people’s head. It is subject to economic and sociology debate. There is also about raising the roof on people’s head.

The field of economy explains when the minimum wage goes up, it is moving on the supply line, and it has an impact on the demand line because the demand line is not moving, it remains at the original intersection of supply and demand line. Therefore, as the supply line is moving upward and demand line remains at the same spot, it creates a shortage of the job. The economist goes further and explains in great details that how the world will fall apart. On the other side of optimism, it is the sociology field of study that gives a counter-argument to the field of economy. The sociology proves that the economic scenario will not happen. There is a merit in what it says and it is proven that it does not happen.

The minimum wage also raises the roof on people’s head which is not discussed in the Canadian politics. It is about teenage moms. According to Statistic Canada “in 2004, Canada had 31,611 teenage pregnancies (30.5 per 1,000 women aged 15 to 19), of which 14,075 resulted in live births”.1 It is sad that only 50% of the children were born. It is a fact that teenage moms would not have access to higher education and would not have high paying jobs. Therefore, they are forced to abort their unborn children.

There is also this fact when mothers are having their children in their wombs, they need to feed their children to have healthy children. The malnutrition has an impact on the children’s immune system, growth implication and “in the long run, malnutrition eventually gives way to long-term complications, such as growth and cognitive delays.”2

All in all, there could be a big debate about the economic misfortune of raising the minimum wage from where it is now to $15.00 CDN per hour so young mothers would be encouraged to work and have roofs on their heads, to have healthy children that these children would not cause a burden on Canada’s healthcare system. It really does not matter how we are paying, it is going to cost us.

Endnote:

1. “Life after teenage motherhood.” Perspectives on Labour and Income: Life after teenage motherhood, http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/75-001-x/2008105/article/10577-eng.htm.

2. “Impact of Malnutrition on Health and Development.” A Child’s Best Start, Orphan Nutrition, http://www.orphannutrition.org/understanding-malnutrition/impact-of-malnutrition-on-health-and-development/.

Ending Violence in Our Community

I am still sad by the news of Cst. John Davidson’s life curtailed in that manner, and a man who was suffering from mental health issue did not have any support to surmount this issue and life of police officer came to an end. One loss is too many loss.

I hope a day comes that we do not use violence as a first resort to solve our problems. Love is the answer to our problems.

Price Tag of Not Caring

Dr. George Grant was a Canadian Political Philosopher. He cherished Conservative political values, and accepted some of the critic of Karl Marx on the key principle of capitalist or liberal economic system as an absolute truth. Dr. Grant books like “Technology and Justice” and “Technology and Empire” are explaining that how the capitalist or liberal economy is only interested about profit and not people.  Thus, it is time to put aside political competition among different political ideologies since this new area is not about the Cold War, but to look at the political economic issues in light of what is best for Canada.

Karl Marx criticized the capitalist economic system in terms of class conflict, it is divided in two classes, a class that has and a class does not have. Since the class has, it is defining the mode of production. The class does not have; it must obey what the class has says. The class has, it is interested to increase productivity to enhance its profit. To increase profit, it needs to have machines that they are working relentlessly and faster than human labor. Therefore, those individuals that they are unable to wear the capitalist or liberal economic, they are doomed to failure.

Currently, scholars like Daron Acemoglu, James Robinson in their book “The Origin of Power, Prosperity, and Poverty Why Nations Fail”, Dr. Jeffrey Sachs’s book “The End of Poverty”, and Canadian social activist Naomi Klein asserted that globalization as a major factor to contribute to poverty in the nations because the multinational corporation are moving their manufactures to the developing nations for the cheap labors and the developed nations are unable to develop workforce to contribute to sustainable economic growth. This trend has been going on for a long time, and the negative impact of globalization on the developed nations are appearing since 1980s.

In 1980s, Canadian public policy in the area of social programs began to have seismic shift from social investment on social programs to reduce poverty of Canadians to the point that caused massive homelessness in Canada which was unprecedented in the Canadian history.[1] It is important to understand that the issue of homelessness is effecting anyone, several attempts made to deal with the issue of homelessness with no concrete result.[2]It is important to understand that there are three types of welfare state.[3] Like “provision of minimum income, provision for the reduction of economic insecurity resulting from such “contingencies” as sickness, old age and unemployment, and provision to all members of society of a range of social services. Under this definition, Canada became a welfare state after the passage of the social welfare reforms of the 1960s”[4] The system did not develop a meaningful strategy to deal with the issue of homelessness.[5] Hence, the issue of homelessness is not dissipating from Canada’s hot button issues. There are some facts that they are worthy to know to understand the future of Canada is bleak in this light:

1)      235,000: Estimated number of people who are homeless in Canada annually.[6]

2)      35,000: Estimated number of people who are homeless in Canada on a given night.[7]

3)      150,000: Approximate number of people who access emergency shelters in Canada annually.[8]

4)      50,000: Estimated number of people who are “hidden homeless” — defined as those without homes of their own who lean on friends or family for shelter — on any given night.[9]

5)      4 million: Number of bed nights, defined as nights during which a shelter bed is occupied, each year across Canada.[10]

6)      $105.3 million: Amount the federal government spends annually on the Homeless Partnering Strategy, which is designed to prevent and reduce homelessness.[11]

7)      82,380: People who found more stable housing as a result of the Homeless Partnering Strategy.[12]

The current strategy to deal with colossal issue of homelessness is to work toward strategy of “the Housing First model across Canada, significant reductions in homelessness in Medicine Hat and Hamilton, federal interest and investment in housing and homelessness, and importantly, the return to a National Housing Strategy – a long overdue conversation in Canada.”[13]

In conclusion, the issue of homelessness is here to stay with us since the world is moving toward globalization. Plus, the United Nations has been expressing concern to Canada the way it has been dealing with the issue of homelessness.[14] “The UN Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights has criticized Canada for its “persistent housing crisis” in a report that points to the lack of a national housing strategy.”[15] The United Nations looked at the issue of homelessness in several areas “

  • 1) “Discrimination faced by First Nations people and people of colour.
  • 2) High unemployment among disadvantaged and marginalized groups and individuals.
  • 3) Minimum wage that falls short of living costs.
  • 4) A stagnation of social spending as a share of GDP.
  • 5) Lack of adequate housing for people with disabilities.”[16]

The issue of homelessness will require attention of three level of governments, private sectors, and non-profit sectors.[17] It is an issue which needs to be dealt with so everyone can benefit from economic prosperity of Canada.

[1] “The State of Homelessness in Canada 2016.” The State of Homelessness in Canada 2016 | The Homeless Hub, homelesshub.ca/SOHC2016.

[2] “The State of Homelessness in Canada 2016.” The State of Homelessness in Canada 2016 | The Homeless Hub, homelesshub.ca/SOHC2016.

[3] Moscovitch, Allan. “Welfare State.” The Canadian Encyclopedia, http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/welfare-state/.

[4] provision of minimum income, provision for the reduction of economic insecurity resulting from such “contingencies” as sickness, old age and unemployment, and provision to all members of society of a range of social services. Under this definition, Canada became a welfare state after the passage of the social welfare reforms of the 1960s

[5] “The State of Homelessness in Canada 2016.” The State of Homelessness in Canada 2016 | The Homeless Hub, homelesshub.ca/SOHC2016.

[6] “Homelessness in Canada: Key statistics.” CTVNews, 16 Mar. 2016, http://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/homelessness-in-canada-key-statistics-1.2819986.

[7] “Homelessness in Canada: Key statistics.” CTVNews, 16 Mar. 2016, http://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/homelessness-in-canada-key-statistics-1.2819986.

[8] “Homelessness in Canada: Key statistics.” CTVNews, 16 Mar. 2016, http://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/homelessness-in-canada-key-statistics-1.2819986.

[9] “Homelessness in Canada: Key statistics.” CTVNews, 16 Mar. 2016, http://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/homelessness-in-canada-key-statistics-1.2819986.

[10] “Homelessness in Canada: Key statistics.” CTVNews, 16 Mar. 2016, http://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/homelessness-in-canada-key-statistics-1.2819986.

[11] “Homelessness in Canada: Key statistics.” CTVNews, 16 Mar. 2016, http://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/homelessness-in-canada-key-statistics-1.2819986.

[12] “Homelessness in Canada: Key statistics.” CTVNews, 16 Mar. 2016, http://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/homelessness-in-canada-key-statistics-1.2819986.

[13] “The State of Homelessness in Canada 2016.” The State of Homelessness in Canada 2016 | The Homeless Hub, homelesshub.ca/SOHC2016.

[14] News, CBC. “UN committee chastises Canada over ‘persistent housing crisis’.” CBCnews, CBC/Radio Canada, 8 Mar. 2016, http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/un-housing-crisis-1.3480979.

[15] The UN Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights has criticized Canada for its “persistent housing crisis” in a report that points to the lack of a national housing strategy.

[16] The UN Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights has criticized Canada for its “persistent housing crisis” in a report that points to the lack of a national housing strategy.

[17] “The State of Homelessness in Canada 2016.” The State of Homelessness in Canada 2016 | The Homeless Hub, homelesshub.ca/SOHC2016.